Posts Tagged doula

Winter Craft Time with the Kiddos!

What a great time it is to work on crafts with the kids during the colder time of the year?!

With being stuck inside on a cold, sometimes rainy, snowy day, why not spend it making crafts and bonding with your little ones?! Not only do you get to spend time together, but there is going to be great decorative outcomes for the whole family!

Carving pumpkins is not strictly reserved for Halloween! Hello?! Pumpkin pie is good all year round and it adds some great decoration to the outside of the house.

Make a hand Christmas wreath! Utilizing various winter colors, blue, white, green, red, make handprint cutouts of your little one’s hands and glue them together in the pattern of a wreath! Then use a hole puncher and some ribbon to hang it around the house! Amazingly cute craft and the kids will have fun!

Helloooooo sparkly snowflakes! All you need are popsicle sticks, a hot glue gun (adult use only), Elmer’s glue and sequins! Glue the popsicle sticks together in two +’s and then hot glue them together. ALLOW THEM TO COOL! Then over a piece of paper, draw lines on the snowflakes and allow the kids to place whatever sequins and/or glitter they’d like. Allow to dry and shake off the excess!

Let’s not forget about making Gingerbread Houses! Not only is it a great holiday tradition, but it involves the whole family and teamwork. It creates a fun atmosphere that allows each other to play up their strengths. Add some Christmas music to the mix and a seasonal candle in the background and you have a small party for the family!

Stuffing stockings are a must that no family can go without! From Dollar Tree to WalMart, you can find cute little trinkets and what nots to go in every stocking you come across. The journey to find everything needed for stockings is all in the excitement!

Share with us some of your holiday craft ideas!

Happy Holidays!
The Excellent Nanny Service

 

Having A a Relative Caregiver for Your Baby

If your mom, aunt, or another relative is available to care for your little one, you may feel like you’ve won the childcare jackpot. The biggest perk of relative care? The peace of mind that comes with knowing that a trusted family member is minding your precious bundle. It’s a win for you and your infant — he gets one-on-one attention, and you get an infant caregiver who’s (usually) much easier On your wallet.               No wonder more than a quarter of all working mothers opt for a relative caregiver.

But as with all options in childcare, there are potential pitfalls to opting for relative care. For one thing, it’d probably be pretty awkward to tell your mom (or worse, your mother-in-law) that you don’t like the way she’s doing her job. Or you might face a relative caregiver (especially if she’s older) who thinks she always knows best — after all, you’re a new mom and she has 20-plus years of experience under her belt. So before you decide to keep it all in the family, ask yourself these questions about choosing a relative caregiver:

Does my relative really want the job? Because you’re family, your mother or mother-in-law may have a hard time saying no to watching your wee one. If she seems hesitant, a frank talk is in order before you proceed. Going down the relative care path without all parties being totally on board isn’t good for anyone, especially your baby.

Is my relative good with kids? Your sister-in-law may love swinging by to visit her nephew, but cuddling a baby for a bit and taking care of one for hours at a time are two very different things. Just as you would if you wanted to hire a nanny, consider your relative’s patience, demeanor, and experience caring for children before you leave your baby with her.

Is my relative physically capable of handling the job? Your mom or dad may be willing — and lobbying hard — for the gig, but are they physically up to the task? Can they lug around a growing baby and crawl around with him on the floor? And even if they can hack it now, will they have the stamina to keep up with your tot as he morphs into a skipping, scampering, high-energy toddler? That happens sooner than you think.

Can I tell my relative what to do? Open communication is key to a successful childcare relationship; some moms, however, find it’s not so easy to bring up issues to a relative caregiver. It’s a point worth considering: For one thing, nannies are childcare pros who are used to working with parents. Plus, you may never see them again once your child’s ready for preschool. None of that is true with a relative caregiver. So given that your brother signed on to watch your baby out of the goodness of his heart, could you call him out if you discover he’s parking your sweetie in front of the TV for hours each day? If the answer’s no, toughen up or reconsider your arrangement.

How flexible is my relative, time-wise and attitude-wise? Is your family member’s schedule really that open for her to make this kind of commitment? And how about her child-rearing beliefs? Even if she disagrees with your take on discipline and naps, would she follow your rules while she’s with your baby? If you suspect not, you may want to rethink “hiring” her so you don’t risk a family feud (or a last-minute search for a backup sitter).

Still want to leave your baby in a relative’s care?

 

Can You Tell I Have Postpartum Depression Just By Looking At Me ?

Postpartum depression

You’ve just had a baby. You expected to be basking in new mom bliss. You expected to be celebrating the arrival of your little one with your friends and family. But instead of celebrating, you feel like crying. You were prepared for joy and excitement, not exhaustion, anxiety, and weepiness. You may not have been expecting it, but mild depression or anxiety and mood swings are common in new mothers—so common, in fact, that it has its own name: the baby blues.

The majority of women experience at least some symptoms of the baby blues immediately after childbirth. It is a feeling precipitated by the sudden change in hormones after delivery, stress, isolation, sleep deprivation, and fatigue. You might feel more tearful, overwhelmed, and emotionally fragile. Generally, this will start within the first couple of days after delivery, peak around one week, and taper off by the end of the second week postpartum.

Signs and symptoms of postpartum depression

Unlike the baby blues, postpartum depression is a more serious problem—one that you shouldn’t ignore. However, it’s not always easy to distinguish between the two.

In the beginning, postpartum depression can look like the normal baby blues. In fact, postpartum depression and the baby blues share many symptoms, including mood swings, crying jags, sadness, insomnia, and irritability. The difference is that with postpartum depression, the symptoms are more severe (such as suicidal thoughts or an inability to care for your newborn) and longer lasting.

  • You might find yourself withdrawing from your partner or being unable to bond well with your baby.
  • You might find your anxiety out of control, preventing you from sleeping –even when the baby is sleep, or eating appropriately.
  • You might find feelings of guilt or worthlessness overwhelming or begin to develop thoughts preoccupied with death or even wish you were not alive.

 

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