Posts Tagged Hiltonhead

Winter Craft Time with the Kiddos!

What a great time it is to work on crafts with the kids during the colder time of the year?!

With being stuck inside on a cold, sometimes rainy, snowy day, why not spend it making crafts and bonding with your little ones?! Not only do you get to spend time together, but there is going to be great decorative outcomes for the whole family!

Carving pumpkins is not strictly reserved for Halloween! Hello?! Pumpkin pie is good all year round and it adds some great decoration to the outside of the house.

Make a hand Christmas wreath! Utilizing various winter colors, blue, white, green, red, make handprint cutouts of your little one’s hands and glue them together in the pattern of a wreath! Then use a hole puncher and some ribbon to hang it around the house! Amazingly cute craft and the kids will have fun!

Helloooooo sparkly snowflakes! All you need are popsicle sticks, a hot glue gun (adult use only), Elmer’s glue and sequins! Glue the popsicle sticks together in two +’s and then hot glue them together. ALLOW THEM TO COOL! Then over a piece of paper, draw lines on the snowflakes and allow the kids to place whatever sequins and/or glitter they’d like. Allow to dry and shake off the excess!

Let’s not forget about making Gingerbread Houses! Not only is it a great holiday tradition, but it involves the whole family and teamwork. It creates a fun atmosphere that allows each other to play up their strengths. Add some Christmas music to the mix and a seasonal candle in the background and you have a small party for the family!

Stuffing stockings are a must that no family can go without! From Dollar Tree to WalMart, you can find cute little trinkets and what nots to go in every stocking you come across. The journey to find everything needed for stockings is all in the excitement!

Share with us some of your holiday craft ideas!

Happy Holidays!
The Excellent Nanny Service

 

Baby Feeding Guide

Use this guide to find out what and how much to feed your child in the first year. The amounts are general recommendations only, so don’t worry if your little one eats a bit more or less than suggested. It’s always a good idea to discuss your plan for starting solids with your child’s doctor before getting started.

Also, you don’t have to introduce solids to your child in any special order. If you want to give your baby a taste of tofu at age 6 months, go ahead, even though it’s not listed on our chart until age 8 months. And while cereal is a traditional first food in the United States, it’s fine to start with mashed fruits or vegetables instead.

Age: Birth to 4 months

Feeding behavior

  • Rooting reflex helps your baby turn toward a nipple to find nourishment.

What to feed

  • Breast milk or formula ONLY

Feeding tip

  • Your baby’s digestive tract is still developing, so solid food is off-limits for now.
Age: 4 to 6 months
Signs of readiness for solid food

The following are some guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Your child is likely ready to try solids when he:

  • Can hold head up and sit upright in highchair
  • Shows significant weight gain (doubled birth weight) and weighs at least 13 pounds
  • Can close mouth around a spoon
  • Can move food from front to back of mouth

What to feed

  • Breast milk or formula, PLUS
  • Pureed vegetables (sweet potatoes, squash)
  • Pureed fruit (apples, bananas, peaches)
  • Pureed meat (chicken, pork, beef)
  • Semi-liquid, iron-fortified cereal
  • Small amounts of unsweetened yogurt (no cow’s milk until age 1)

How much per day

  • Begin with about 1 teaspoon pureed food or cereal. Mix cereal with 4 to 5 teaspoons breast milk or formula. (It will be very runny.)
  • Increase to 1 tablespoon of pureed food, or 1 tablespoon of cereal mixed with breast milk or formula, twice a day. If you’re giving cereal, gradually thicken the consistency by using less liquid.

Feeding tips

  • If your baby won’t eat what you offer the first time, try again in a few days.
  • Introduce new foods one at a time. Wait two or three days, if possible, before offering another new food. (Wait three days if your baby or family has a history of allergies.) It’s also a good idea to write down the foods your baby samples. If he has an adverse reaction, a food log will make it easier to pinpoint the cause.
  • The order in which you introduce new foods doesn’t usually matter. Your child’s doctor can advise you.
Age: 6 to 8 months
Signs of readiness for solid food

  • Same as 4 to 6 months

What to feed

  • Breast milk or formula, PLUS
  • Pureed or strained fruits (banana, pears, applesauce, peaches, avocado)
  • Pureed or strained vegetables (well-cooked carrots, squash, sweet potato)
  • Pureed meat (chicken, pork, beef)
  • Pureed tofu
  • Small amounts of unsweetened yogurt (no cow’s milk until age 1)
  • Pureed legumes (black beans, chickpeas, edamame, fava beans, black-eyed peas, lentils, kidney beans)
  • Iron-fortified cereal (oats, barley)

How much per day

  • 1 teaspoon fruit, gradually increased to 2 or 3 tablespoons in four feedings
  • 1 teaspoon vegetables, gradually increased to 2 or 3 tablespoons in four feedings
  • 3 to 9 tablespoons cereal in 2 or 3 feedings

Feeding tips

  • Introduce new foods one at a time. Wait two or three days, if possible, before offering another new food. (Wait three days if your baby or family has a history of allergies.) It’s also a good idea to write down the foods your baby samples. If she has an adverse reaction, a food log will make it easier to pinpoint the cause.
  • The order in which you introduce new foods doesn’t usually matter. Your child’s doctor can advise you.

Age: 8 to 10 months

Signs of readiness for solid and finger foods

  • Same as 6 to 8 months, PLUS
  • Picks up objects with thumb and forefinger
  • Can transfer items from one hand to the other
  • Puts everything in his mouth
  • Moves jaw in a chewing motion

What to feed

  • Breast milk or formula, PLUS
  • Small amounts of soft pasteurized cheese, cottage cheese, and unsweetened yogurt
  • Mashed vegetables (cooked carrots, squash, potatoes, sweet potatoes)
  • Mashed fruits (bananas, peaches, pears, avocados)
  • Finger Foods (O-shaped cereal, small bits of scrambled eggs, well-cooked pieces of potato, well-cooked spiral pasta, teething crackers, small pieces of bagel)
  • Protein (small bits of meat, poultry, boneless fish, tofu, and well-cooked beans, like lentils, split peas, pintos, or black beans)
  • Iron-fortified cereal (barley, wheat, oats, mixed cereals)

How much per day

  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup dairy (or 1/2 ounce cheese)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup iron-fortified cereal
  • 3/4 to 1 cup fruit
  • 3/4 to 1 cup vegetables
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons protein-rich food

Feeding tip

  • Introduce new foods one at a time. Wait two or three days, if possible, before offering another new food. (Wait three days if your baby or family has a history of allergies.) It’s also a good idea to write down the foods your baby samples. If he has an adverse reaction, a food log will make it easier to pinpoint the cause.
Age: 10 to 12 months
Signs of readiness for other solid foods
  • Same as 8 to 10 months, PLUS
  • Swallows food more easily
  • Has more teeth
  • No longer pushes food out of mouth with tongue
  • Tries to use a spoon

What to feed

  • Breast milk or formula PLUS
  • Soft pasteurized cheese, yogurt, cottage cheese (no cow’s milk until age 1)
  • Fruit mashed or cut into cubes or strips
  • Bite-size, soft-cooked vegetables (peas, carrots)
  • Combo foods (macaroni and cheese, casseroles)
  • Protein (small bits of meat, poultry, boneless fish, tofu, and well-cooked beans)
  • Finger foods (O-shaped cereal, small bits of scrambled eggs, well-cooked pieces of potato, well-cooked spiral pasta, teething crackers, small pieces of bagel)
  • Iron-fortified cereals (barley, wheat, oats, mixed cereals)

How much per day

  • 1/3 cup dairy (or 1/2 ounce cheese)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup iron-fortified cereal
  • 3/4 to 1 cup fruit
  • 3/4 to 1 cup vegetables
  • 1/8 to 1/4 cup combo foods
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons protein-rich food

Feeding tip

  • Introduce new foods one at a time. Wait two or three days, if possible, before offering another new food. (Wait three days if your baby or family has a history of allergies.) It’s also a good idea to write down the foods your baby samples. If she has an adverse reaction, a food log will make it easier to pinpoint the cause.

Early Potty Training Method

Elimination communication is a method of early potty training by which a parent carefully watches a baby for signs that she’s about to pee or poop. As soon as the baby “announces” that she needs a potty break (she may squirm in a certain way, for example, or grimace or grunt), Mom or another caregiver gets her to a toilet or potty pronto and holds her over it bare-bottomed so that she takes care of business there and not in a diaper. Some parents begin elimination communication as early as a few weeks, others wait longer, but no matter how old (or young!) a child, early potty training has its benefits. Here are some of the biggest advantages.

EC reduces the need for diapers. Most infants need to be changed from five to ten times a day. And even though babies need fewer diaper changes as they get older, the number of nappies they go through will reach into the thousands by the time they’re toilet-trained. Most parents who do infant potty training use diapers some of the time (overnight, for example, or when they’re on the go), but even so, elimination communication can cut the total number drastically.
EC is easier on the pocketbook. This math is easy: Using fewer diapers means less money spent buying them!
EC is easier on the environment. Disposable diapers eat up resources when they’re manufactured and pile up in landfills after they’re used. Washing cloth diapers uses water and energy. When it comes to the environment, neither option is better than the other, but using fewer diapers of either type by going the elimination communication route is unquestionably the greenest way to go.
EC may be more comfortable for babies. Minus the bulk around her bottom, a baby can kick her chubby little legs and otherwise move more freely than she might wrapped in a nappy.
EC can stave off diaper rash. A sore, red tushie is typically caused by a trio of factors: moisture trapped against skin that’s enclosed in an airless environment and exposed to potential irritants, such as the residue from urine or feces and/or chemicals like the fragrances in a wipe. Most of these rash-raisers are non-issues when a baby spends less time in a diaper.
EC encourages bonding. Elimination communication requires keeping an almost-constant eye on a baby in order to catch her when she needs to pee or poop. Not only does this increase the quantity of time a parent (or caregiver) spends in contact with her child, it can enhance the quality of those close encounters by requiring Mom to really pay attention to how her baby expresses her needs.
EC is natural. At least, it’s natural when you consider that worldwide, most mothers deal with their infants’ toileting needs without using diapers. Particularly in Asia and Africa, babies are toted around with their butts bare. When they show signs of needing to relieve themselves, their mothers simply hold them away from their own bodies.

Page 1 of 212

 

LET’S GET SOCIAL!